Webinar: Community Health and Economic Prosperity

Save the Date: 9/9/2020 at 1:00-2:30 PM EST for Community Health & Economic Prosperity –


Join Vice Admiral Jerome M. Adams, MD, MPH, along with top leaders in the field of community health from Penn and beyond, as they discuss opportunities for the food industry to create a healthy and equitable food system. The webinar will be held September 9, 2020 from 1:00 – 2:30 PM, and is sponsored by the following.

Registration is limited, details here

Community Scholars In-Residence

 

Applications are now being accepted for the Community Scholars-in-Residence program which will be focused on cancer prevention and control research.

Please contact Jill McDonald at jillmcd@upenn.edu  for more information and a program application.

 

Through this program, scholars will develop relationships with a community research partner of their choosing, identify research opportunities, and co-develop research projects during a one to two-year tenure with a community partner organization.

Eligibility: Standing pre/post docs with an interest in conducting community-engaged health research Project Topics: Projects must focus on cancer prevention and control research, and must be co-developed with a community partner Program Duration: 12-24 months Funding: Each Scholar/Community Organization team will receive up to $5,000 for their project Program Start: September 2018. Application Deadline: June 1, 2018 EXTENDED THROUGH JUNE!

Program Structure:

Faculty Mentorship: Scholars will identify a mentor from qualified faculty in the area of cancer prevention and control research. Mentors will guide the development, implementation and evaluation of the project. Scholars are expected to meet with their mentor on a monthly basis. Mentors will receive $500 (for discretionary funds) for their support.

Community Partner Organization: The community partner organization should be identified by the scholar and can include any community organization that provides, plans for, coordinates, organizes, pays for, or regulates health/public health services or impacts health outcomes in the community.

Time Commitment: Scholars will devote an average of 4-6 hours per week to this program and it is expected that a majority of the time will be spent with the community partner.

Formal Training: Scholars will participate in a one-day kick-off workshop that will cover key community-engaged research skills and participate in regular meetings and trainings that will provide opportunities for sharing personal experiences and lessons learned. Representatives from the community partner organizations will be invited to participate in the meetings.

Funding: Scholars will develop a project and submit a proposal for funding (up to $5,000 per project). We suggest building in a minimum of $500 for your host organization.

 

Funding for this program comes from Community Engagement and Research Core in the Penn CTSA and the UPenn Cancer Prevention and Control Research Network (CPCRN).

A Tobacco-Free Penn Campus

The Student Health Service/Campus Health department at the University of Pennsylvania created videos to accompany their tobacco-free campus campaign. Watch their video, supported by the University of Pennsylvania Prevention Research Center (UPenn PRC), to learn more about their plans to improve health and create a more beautiful and sustainable campus.

 

 

Visit their website for more information on this ongoing project and look for the signage that alerts students and staff that Penn is Tobacco Free. Student Health Services has also provided a Tobacco Cessation Resources brochure to help students quit smoking.

Libraries Can Be a Health Resource for Vulnerable Populations: PRC Researchers Cannuscio, Grande, & Klusaritz

cannusciograndeklusaritzforwebsiteIn a recent Fox News Health report, UPenn PRC Community Engagement Core Lead Carolyn Cannuscio ScD, shed light on the role modern-day libraries can play as multi-faceted community resource centers. “Some people would argue that libraries are old-fashioned, outmoded institutions that are irrelevant in the digital age,” said Cannuscio, a social epidemiologist at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. “Our work shows very clearly that libraries are vital, dynamic organizations that know their patrons well and respond creatively to community needs.”

 

Through the Healthy Library Initiative, Cannuscio and fellow PRC Researchers David Grande, MD, MPA, and Heather Klusaritz, PhD, MSW  identified ten programs aligned with the Free Library of Philadelphia which address social determinants of health within the Philadelphia community. After conducting interviews, the researchers found that libraries provided a safe space, for especially vulnerable populations which include “homeless people, people with mental illness and substance use, recent immigrants, and children and families suffering from trauma.”

 

In this new model, librarians assist with employment searches, applications for health insurance, and support other helpful programs such as classes on nutrition and youth leadership. The 54 libraries across the city of Philadelphia see 5.8 million in-person and 9.9 million online visits annually.  Cannuscio emphasizes the importance of having a space that provides shelter and services without any charge.

 

Read more about the study in Health Affairs.